Autorenarchive: Stephan

Naked

Music by Andrew Dickson
Produced by Stephan Eicke

Reviews:
“Dickson’s score for Naked is as raw and relentless as the character’s narcissistic sexual appetite, driven by the incessant cyclical tension of Dickson’s harp ostinato. The music from the intense dramedy Secrets & Lies is given a despondently dejected jazz atmosphere which clouds the emotive texture of its melodramatic familial and social discourse, This collection is an affecting group of tone poems for damaged souls and lost compassions. Dickson’s mix of folk and jazz idioms saturates the glimpses of humanity that Leigh explores in these thoughtful films.”
BuySoundtrax.com

“[Naked is a] dramatic soundtrack that starts lyrical and becomes progressively clouded. It darkens and provokes an impression of emptiness and desolation.”
MundoBSO

“As we head to the end of the year, we get this treat and what I call a musical project that we needed from Mike Leigh’s collective works by composer Andrew Dickson. As the music tells a story from each project, I am finding a pleasant jazz feel into strong guitar that is only built up by the rest of the instruments. Then towards the end of the music, it’s subtle yet memorable to the ears and this serves as a solid collection of music.”
JMHDigital

Lost and Love

Music by Zbigniew Preisner
Produced by Stephan Eicke

Reviews:
“Artists seek to draw us closer to a state of consciousness that only they can evoke. From that deep place, Zbigniew Preisner’s music speaks to us. His music has touched our emotions deeply for decades. His melodies filter the light that breaks the darkness and illuminates the dark path we have to take on our return. Preisner’s ability to connect with the emotional part of our reality is once again manifested by listening to his heartfelt work Lost and Love.”
El Baùl de los Genios

Like with other works by Preisner, one can sense how he aims to reach purity through something beautiful and seemingly simple. (…) The developments are splendid and gratifying.”
Underscores.fr

“The music Preisner wrote to Shi Gu is a typical work of melancholy and beauty, full of veracious emotions, but not without minor traces that suggest melodrama. (…) The high-level quality that Preisner is able to produce for Shi Gu is befitting of one of the best actively writing composers. An absolute masterpiece.”
MainTitles.net

“Stunning theme, with a score that features so much musical character
and it needs to be heard. I found myself enjoying each track, from next
to next… it was worth it.”
JMHDigital

Lost and Love is an expressive and engaging work with a
sturdy classical structure; its tantalizing melodies evoking both
sympathy and strength as the story proceeds along its course.”
BuySoundtrax

“Preisner manages to get under your skin and tug at the heart strings
with his themes here, an impressive enough task if you can do it once
in a score, but he does it so many times over the course of this album
that it starts to feel effortless. It’s pretty obvious that the music is
the heart and soul of the movie. If melancholic, beautiful scores are
your thing… you’re going to fall in love with Lost and Love. It’s an
album you’re very unlikely to tire of hearing and certainly one that
will give you years of pleasure.”
ReviewGraveyard

“The composer wrote a beautiful, elegant and refined soundtrack,
dramatic, lyrical and intimate. (…) The main theme is remarkable.”
MundoBSO

“There is a hauntingly beautiful musical entity present from the start, the composer’s abundantly melodic and heartrending tone poems filling and overflowing into each other. At first it seems as these are unassuming and simple pieces of music, but they have the ability to fixate and almost hypnotise the listener. There is a slightness and tantalising aura to them and a style and sound that it is impossible not to notice or be affected by.”
John Mansell

Birds Do It, Bees Do It

Music by Gerald Fried
Produced by Stephan Eicke

Reviews:
“Only one documentary has ever been Oscar-nominated for its musical score: this 1975 David L. Wolper production on the mating habits of animals, composed by Gerald Fried (who would later win an Emmy for Wolper’s Roots). Fried’s early example of a hybrid score — partly electronic, partly orchestral — served the little-seen doc perfectly.”
Variety

“Fried delivers a mix of classical and experimental music, always surprising and relevant. It’s a delight!”
Underscores.fr

“The contrast between the creepily electronic (“Aphids,” “Fight Aftermath/Wasp Embryo”) and the majestically orchestral (“Chimp Lullaby,” “Elephants and Lions”) and diverse nature in between makes for a very fine and thoroughly delightful listen, bookended by the glittering “Flowers Opening” at the start and the elegant “Waltz of the Grebe” at the conclusion. Highly recommended!”
BuySoundtrax

“What struck me most about this release was how varied and intricate
each of the themes were. While not all of them instantly seem to fit
with the animals they are depicting this is mainly down to the fact that
Fried steers clear of cliches as much as possible. ‘Wasps’ is an
obvious exception to this, as the track opens with an eerie buzzing
sound. This is another winner from Caldera. Long may they continue to
unearth long forgotten gems like this.”
ReviewGraveyard

“Great score, some tracks are little freaky [good way]… I was listening as I worked around my house and at some-point I was immersed in the music I stopped working. It’s been a very long time since I was taken away into the music, very nice.”
JMHDigital

“The composer wrote pure poetry; open and beautiful music in various
styles […] There is also more experimental music, avant-garde and
electronic, which is unorthodox and tries to capture animals in a
musical language.”
MundoBSO

Ambition

Music by Leonard Rosenman
Produced by Stephan Eicke

Reviews:
“This is an undiscovered gem by Leonard Rosenman. It is an elaborate score, impressionistic at times, far away from conventional approaches to action films or thrillers. It is very sophisticated and exquisitely crafted.”
MundoBSO

“Rosenman’s music here is intricate, multi-layered and perfect for the movie. However, on balance it feels like a disconnected collection of music cues rather than a soundtrack album in its own right. […] I’m pleased that Caldera has managed to acquire the rights to release this as fans of Rosenman’s work will relish the opportunity to finally own it. It’s an important work, just not something that is engaging enough to warrant listening to too often.”
ReviewGraveyard

“Honestly never heard of this film, but know the actors and definitely know the work of this composer. Starting out strong as we take the path of a little innocence, we begin to feel it’s certain strength and musical intentions. Suspense and intrigue are as to follow, nice use of plotting sounds and a theme that hold their own.”
JMHDigital

The History of Eternity

Music by Zbigniew Preisner
Produced by Stephan Eicke

Reviews:
The History of Eternity… sweeping with a gliding gentleness and another superb masterpiece by legendary composer Zbigniew Preisner released on Caldera Records. Finding it’s way into your heart, every track brings a moving whisper into the light and we are drawn to see it from the darkness. This album plays heavy on the guitar and the theme that keeps you moving from start to finish and holds my attention.”
JMHDigital

“There’s not a wasted second of music here. The composer expertly weaves his themes (although you have to give Caldera credit for sorting them into in a naturally fluid order that ensures that they build as the album progresses) to become an integral part of the movie experience, yet being strong enough to stand on their own two feet outside of the film.
Another beautiful release from a record label that cares about soundtracks as much as the fans. This is yet another score I’ll be revisiting for years to come.”
Review Graveyard

“It has a beautiful main theme and motifs of similar approaches in their economy, their beautiful nakedness and emotional sense of love for life.”
MundoBSO

“A História Da Eternidade is a typically excellent Preisner score, even if the film itself has some issues. Not quite on the level of Skyggenes Dal, but with much of the same DNA – heartbreaking, high-pitched melody lines, slow and beautiful chord modulations and ‘spacey’ use of a relatively small musical ensemble. Hopefully, this premiere release, and Caldera’s “Preisner project” in general, will allow more people to re-appreciate the composer’s film work, post-Kieslowski.”
Celluloid Tunes

“Two of the three characters in the story play musicians, so music is also an integral part of the film story, but its use as score remains reserved. Midway through a few tracks such as “The Hunt,” “Re-Discover,” “Rain 1,” “Rain 2,” “Arrival Song,” “The Sea,” and “Main Titles Version 2,” the music grows a little livelier and poised, allowing the piano, violin, and guitar to imbue a heartier tone, and by the “End Credits” the melody, if not fully impassioned, emerges confidently in its most enriched resolve. It’s a very interesting score, harboring intimate beauty in its austerity.”
BuySoundtrax

The Baby

Music by Gerald Fried
Produced by Stephan Eicke

Reviews:
“Built around a disturbing theme, which recurs several times in the form of a lullaby, the score sometimes evokes a western rather than a thriller (including the theme of the guitar at the end of the program). It is very well written and orchestrated, and Caldera gives us the opportunity to discover a composer too little known. I adhere!”
Underscores.fr

“Central to the score is a single, strikingly provocative melodic main theme played on cello and on woodwinds and contrasted against a number of sonic colors in its journey through the film; set against this pleasing melody is a chiming music box motif played by a celeste and the use of percussive rattles which are both associated with the titular adult infant. Gradually, the score takes on an unsettling creepiness as the story descends into stranger and more dangerous sonic ground, while remaining a captivating listen throughout. The interaction between the cello and violin – played by renowned musicians Edgar Lustgarten and Anatole Kominsky, respectively – is especially striking here in suggesting the psychological struggles of the main characters. The 46-year old music tracks are nicely remastered, preserving a fine sound despite the inherent smallness of the performing ensemble.”
BuySoundtrax

“The composer’s work is typical for the 70s; it’s a mix of symphonic music and pop melodies, warm and light. The score revolves around a main title that evokes a lullaby, bringing tenderness to the story. It also has a more sinister undercurrent which evolves throughout the film, while there is always an ambiguity between pure horror and black humor. It’s fill of powerful themes.”
MundoBSO

“Scaring us without being scared, showering us with chimes and a dabble of bells. A car seat to baby carriage… innocence takes a backseat, when you close your eyes and hearing this piece it will be in your heart. I think that made sense, if not then just listen to this score. It’s really worth it.”
JMHDigital

“Ah, wonderful, wonderful Caldera Records. They never disappoint. Gerald Fried’s music for The Baby represents a sublime score and an unusually sweet one, considering the movie was marketed as a horror. While it’s a monothematic score, having really only one main theme that is revisited throughout the tracks, Fried has the decency to dress it up and present it in numerous ways so that the listener never tires of it. There are plenty of other minor themes which weave in and out of the tracks too, all of which are worthy of your attention.”
ReviewGraveyard

Valley of Shadows

Music by Zbigniew Preisner
Produced by Stephan Eicke

Reviews:
“Working as a seamless unit with his cinematographer brother Marius Matzow Gulbrandsen, and making majestic use of a melancholy, trance-like score by the great Kieslowski collaborator Zbigniew Preisner, the director shows bold assurance that helps paper over thin stretches in the narrative.”
Hollywood Reporter

“To provide a correspondingly enthralling yet disquieting score, Gulbrandsen enlists Krzysztof Kieślowski favourite Zbigniew Preisner, whose blend of piano and electronic instruments proves just as astutely crafted.”
Screen Daily

“If you are into ambient minimalism, it rarely gets better than this; there’s no drama, no loud moments, just that eternal, sparse flow of sounds. I’ve been missing dearly an album like this. Brian Eno once said that “Ambient music must be able to accommodate many levels of listening attention without enforcing one in particular; it must be as ignorable as it is interesting”. “Valley of shadows” fits right in.”
Soundtrack Dreams

“Shot in 35mm by the director’s brother Marius Matzow Gulbrandsen using achingly beautiful images that feel as if they’re recalling some forgotten legend of Norse mythology (with a touch of Maurice Sendak’s “Where the Wild Things Are”), the film isolates this eerily fair-skinned child in a shadowy landscape of inchoate menace, accompanied by Zbigniew Preisner’s richly realized orchestral score.”
Variety

“It is a minimalist, but beautiful work by Preisner with sustained notes for strings, a male choir and synths, which present a sense of purity, even a certain religiosity or mysticism. Considering the genre, this is quite striking, and I imagine it will fascinate some listeners while it might bore others.”
Underscores.fr

“The composer created a soundtrack with orchestra, synthesizers and with the prominent use of the piano to create an atmosphere that is placid, melancholy and dramatic. The voice of Lisa Gerrard has a magical, gothic air to it, and it helps to provide a sense of mystery. It is slow, atmospheric, at times hazy and lyrical as well as luminous.”
MundoBSO

“This is a beautifully lyrical and mesmerizing work which is as sonically enchanting as it is haunting. The music’s dark and menacing fabric manages to be creepy but evocative, deliriously compelling and yet dangerously foreboding.”
BuySoundtrax

“It’s an album that you can give your full attention to, as what at first appears mellow and ambient, is in fact multilayered and carefully structured. It’s not, however, a soundtrack that you can dip in and out of very easily. This is a score that you need to listen to from start to finish, as some of the themes and motifs grow and shift as the album progresses. It’s a beautifully rich score that is extremely rewarding.”
ReviewGraveyard

“This is a beautifully lyrical and mesmerizing work which is as sonically enchanting as it is haunting. The music’s dark and menacing fabric manages to be creepy but evocative, deliriously compelling and yet dangerously foreboding.”
MusiqueFantastique

The Lost Children of Planet X

Music by Christopher Young, Bob Badway
Produced by Stephan Eicke

Reviews:
“Along with this musical tale, which is somewhat bizarre and spectacular, there are eight instrumentals which serve the story. They are psychedelic and it’s very nice music, indeed.”
MundoBSO

“It’s also great to hear another side to Young’s musical talent. We know and love him for his deep, rich, brooding music, but he proves here he can just as easily turn his hand to psychedelic funky weirdness.”
ReviewGraveyard

“A nice tribute to classic sci-fi films, a dash of Forbidden Planet, drop of Forbidden Zone and sprinkled with a little crazy out of this world music! Trust me I have listened to it several times and I get a little more each time… it’s worth it! It’s MADNESS, in a good way!”
JMHDigital

Sunrise

Music by Joe Kraemer
Produced by Stephan Eicke

Reviews:
“Kraemer’s music is lively, colorful, highly thematic and completely addictive. Bravo!”
Underscores.fr

“It’s necessarily a wall-to-wall but Kraemer keeps it constantly interesting; it’s also necessarily a small ensemble of approximately fifteen live players, but their work is deftly orchestrated and the small size accommodates the music with a very intimate presence, and a gorgeous main theme that opens from a few tentative rays before emerging fully into the glory of its melody – just like a sunrise. […] In its entirety as well as most of its more intimate musical moments, Joe Kraemer’s SUNRISE is a completely captivating work.”
BuySoundtrax

“[SUNRISE] is structured around three central themes, one for the protagonist, delicate and fragile (wife), the other frivolous and self-assured (the lover) and the third one ambiguous (husband). These three themes are developed, creating a narrative for various situations. The score has moments of great intensity.”
MundoBSO

““Sunrise” is a clever blend of orchestral and jazzy, a delightful assortment of symphonic dialogues and surprises and, if you want, a composer out-desplating Alexandre Desplat on his own often quirky orchestral turf. Do not miss this one.”
SoundtrackDreams

“It’s always a joy when we receive the latest score from Caldera Records. I like to clear my schedule so that I can just soak up the music without any distractions. I’d probably stick my neck out and say that this is their finest release to date. Joe Kraemer’s music is uplifting, memorable and energetic – not to mention diverse. A truly beautiful and memorable soundtrack. I don’t know how Caldera can top this one.”
ReviewGraveyard

“A charging rousing score, filled with plenty of high points and great amount of my favorite horns. Joe Kraemer like everything attacked this project and brought it too life and Caldera Records again amazes me, again and again!!”
JMHDigital.com

Not Afraid, Not Afraid

Music by Gabriel Yared
Produced by Stephan Eicke

Reviews:
“It is an excellent initiative to exhume this score for a film that was never released. Yared presents a lovely chamber music score, evoking childhood with fondness via memorable melodies, that are both touching and funny, and an instrumentation that leaves us in a sweet nostalgia.”
Underscores.fr

“I think “Not afraid not afraid” is one of Yared’s more experimental and varied compositions as there are moments when the orchestra almost seems to improvise, like in “Fire”; it’s a fascinating standalone listening experience, quiet and light, like a miniature of a film score. I for one I am happy to have a chance to discover it.”
SoundtrackDreams

“I have been enjoying the score “Not Afraid, Not Afraid” by composer Gabriel Yared… It’s subtle, filled with charm and a little perky at times.”
JMHDigital

“The score has a warm main theme that is nostalgic and evocative. The music is warm and friendly and makes it easier to sympathise with a character who isn’t likeable at all.”
MundoBSO